Archive for March, 2008

Sales Hit of the Day: BODY LANGUAGE

March 31, 2008

One of the most powerful things a sales professional can do is become a master at reading body language.

Not only will it help you read your prospect’s true attitude about you and the sale, you can also take steps to make sure your unconscious actions don’t make selling more difficult than it needs to be.

For example, swallowing frequently, clearing your throat, tugging at your ear, or repeatedly blinking your eyes can actually create a negative perception of you. Naturally, you want to avoid making these moves when you are with your customer.

Start learning all you can about the subtleties of body language, and put that knowledge to use to make more sales.

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BODY LANGUAGE

March 31, 2008

One of the most powerful things a sales professional can do is become a master at reading body language.

Not only will it help you read your prospect’s true attitude about you and the sale, you can also take steps to make sure your unconscious actions don’t make selling more difficult than it needs to be.

For example, swallowing frequently, clearing your throat, tugging at your ear, or repeatedly blinking your eyes can actually create a negative perception of you. Naturally, you want to avoid making these moves when you are with your customer.

Start learning all you can about the subtleties of body language, and put that knowledge to use to make more sales.

Sales Hit of the Day: READY TO ROCK

March 28, 2008

I have seen a ton of rock concerts in my lifetime, and I am always ready to see more!

An average show runs about 90 minutes in length, but some are shorter and some are longer.

Some concerts have a ton of supporting elements like visual and audio effects, and some feature just the artist and the music without a lot of distraction.

There is no one standard formula for a great concert. Every entertainer has a unique style, attitude, and energy level they bring to the stage. Every audience member has their unique expectations of the show, which may or may not be met when the show goes on.

But there is one constant: an artist who performs with confidence and enthusiasm will always win over the audience. Show me an entertainer who is just having a ball doing what they are doing and I’ll wager every time they come to town the venue will be packed with raving fans who are there to enjoy every moment of the show, and take home a few t-shirts, hats, posters, and CDs.

The same is true for salespeople.

Some will have a long presentation, and others will keep it short. Some will use slide shows, brochures, and beefy proposals; other will only bring their words, a contract and pen to make the sale.

Everybody sells differently. Every customer has different needs. There is no one perfect formula that makes every sale.

But there is one constant: a salesperson who is confident about themselves, enthusiastic about what they sell, and just has fun doing what they do will always have raving fans who are ready to buy.

Let your audience see your confidence, enthusiasm, and willingness to have fun, and you’ll rock your sales goals!

Are you ready to rock?

READY TO ROCK

March 28, 2008

I have seen a ton of rock concerts in my lifetime, and I am always ready to see more!

An average show runs about 90 minutes in length, but some are shorter and some are longer.

Some concerts have a ton of supporting elements like visual and audio effects, and some feature just the artist and the music without a lot of distraction.

There is no one standard formula for a great concert. Every entertainer has a unique style, attitude, and energy level they bring to the stage. Every audience member has their unique expectations of the show, which may or may not be met when the show goes on.

But there is one constant: an artist who performs with confidence and enthusiasm will always win over the audience. Show me an entertainer who is just having a ball doing what they are doing and I’ll wager every time they come to town the venue will be packed with raving fans who are there to enjoy every moment of the show, and take home a few t-shirts, hats, posters, and CDs.

The same is true for salespeople.

Some will have a long presentation, and others will keep it short. Some will use slide shows, brochures, and beefy proposals; other will only bring their words, a contract and pen to make the sale.

Everybody sells differently. Every customer has different needs. There is no one perfect formula that makes every sale.

But there is one constant: a salesperson who is confident about themselves, enthusiastic about what they sell, and just has fun doing what they do will always have raving fans who are ready to buy.

Let your audience see your confidence, enthusiasm, and willingness to have fun, and you’ll rock your sales goals!

Are you ready to rock?

Sales Hit of the Day: THINK OF ME

March 27, 2008

Not long ago, I had to have my automatic garage door opener repaired as the torsion spring had broken which finally made it impossible to get the car out of the garage.

The company I called connected me directly to the guy who would ultimately do the job and he told me he would arrive at my house by a certain time. He actually showed up early, looked over the situation, and quickly identified the problem areas giving me item by item estimates as he went.

After about 90 minutes work, the repair was complete and my car was not longer held hostage. I signed the work order and paid for the job, then headed to the garage to leave.

When I got there, I noticed that a small but clearly legible sticker had been placed next to the button on the wall that activates the opener. It only had 2 pieces of information: the name of the company, and their phone number.

This is another example of brilliant marketing that doesn’€™t cost a ton of money, and I am surprised more service companies don’€™t do this.

Would this technique work for you? Is there some way for you to sign or tag your work so your customer will know who to call next time? How can you effectively and inexpensively remind your customers to “€œthink of me”€ when they have a problem?

THINK OF ME

March 27, 2008

Not long ago, I had to have my automatic garage door opener repaired as the torsion spring had broken which finally made it impossible to get the car out of the garage.

The company I called connected me directly to the guy who would ultimately do the job and he told me he would arrive at my house by a certain time. He actually showed up early, looked over the situation, and quickly identified the problem areas giving me item by item estimates as he went.

After about 90 minutes work, the repair was complete and my car was not longer held hostage. I signed the work order and paid for the job, then headed to the garage to leave.

When I got there, I noticed that a small but clearly legible sticker had been placed next to the button on the wall that activates the opener. It only had 2 pieces of information: the name of the company, and their phone number.

This is another example of brilliant marketing that doesn’€™t cost a ton of money, and I am surprised more service companies don’€™t do this.

Would this technique work for you? Is there some way for you to sign or tag your work so your customer will know who to call next time? How can you effectively and inexpensively remind your customers to “€œthink of me”€ when they have a problem?

Sales Hit of the Day: MISUNDERSTANDING

March 26, 2008

Yesterday I did a presentation on time management for an association of financial institutions. The room was packed, the audience was attentive and appreciative, and it was a really great experience.

As usually happens at a speaking engagement, many people gave me their business card and asked me to send them notes from the presentation or subscribe them to the Sales Hit of the Day.

One group at a table gave me a stack of several cards, one from each person sitting there, and I noticed they were all from the same firm. I turned toward the table and half-jokingly suggested a networking seminar was needed to help them learn not to sit together at networking events.

The response from a person at the table was, “we’re not selling today so we don’t need to do that.”

I think a lot of people have that misunderstanding about networking. Networking is not necessarily about making an active pitch to sell something. More often then not, it’s about helping others make progress in whatever challenges they face. It’s about being supportive, resourceful and, ultimately, a trusted advisor.

If you feel your networking has not been productive, you might have the same misunderstanding. Ask yourself what your true motives are and, if they are self-serving, make the appropriate adjustment so that you are primarily serving others…instead of yourself.

When you make that shift, I promise you will see amazing things happen.

Sales Hit of the Day: MAGNET AND STEEL

March 25, 2008

Last summer, a guy named Steve was advertising fast, efficient, and inexpensive lawn service, so I thought I would give him a try.

He showed up at the appointed time to assess the lawn and provide a quote, which was really inexpensive. In fact, the price was too low and I knew it, even if he didn’t. So I told him I would pay him double if he could do the job that weekend.

With a genuine smile, he agreed and he returned with a helper (his son) on the appointed day and a few hours later it was finished. In the process, they had uncovered and dealt with a beehive, so I added a little extra money on top of what I said I would pay them.

Steve was gracious, grateful and, before he left, he asked if he could give me his card so I can call him the next time work needed to be done. I told him I would like his card and he responded with, “regular or magnetic?” Brilliant!

I opted for the magnetic one so I could put it on the steel front door of our refrigerator.

Now spring it here, the grass is starting to grow, and I am thinking its time to call a service. And just as Steve planned, his magnetic business card is hanging where I see it every day.

Sometimes, all it takes to be a smart marketer is an appropriate use of magnet and steel.

Could you use Steve’s technique to stay in front of your customers?

MAGNET AND STEEL

March 25, 2008

Last summer, a guy named Steve was advertising fast, efficient, and inexpensive lawn service, so I thought I would give him a try.

He showed up at the appointed time to assess the lawn and provide a quote, which was really inexpensive. In fact, the price was too low and I knew it, even if he didn’t. So I told him I would pay him double if he could do the job that weekend.

With a genuine smile, he agreed and he returned with a helper (his son) on the appointed day and a few hours later it was finished. In the process, they had uncovered and dealt with a beehive, so I added a little extra money on top of what I said I would pay them.

Steve was gracious, grateful and, before he left, he asked if he could give me his card so I can call him the next time work needed to be done. I told him I would like his card and he responded with, “regular or magnetic?” Brilliant!

I opted for the magnetic one so I could put it on the steel front door of our refrigerator.

Now spring it here, the grass is starting to grow, and I am thinking its time to call a service. And just as Steve planned, his magnetic business card is hanging where I see it every day.

Sometimes, all it takes to be a smart marketer is an appropriate use of magnet and steel.

Could you use Steve’s technique to stay in front of your customers?

Sales Hit of the Day: SHOW AND TELL

March 24, 2008

Isn’t it compelling when you get a phone solicitation? Don’t you get excited when you hear a product or service described to you? Doesn’t the waiter’s description of today’s special Just make you drool??

It doesn’t? Why do you think that is?

Perhaps it is because you and I were trained from birth to understand that you ‘can’t believe everything you hear’ but ‘seeing is believing’.

So if you want your client to believe in you, your product, and your company, stop telling them about it. Instead, find a way to show them.

Offer a demonstration. Share a video of client testimonials. Give them a test drive. Show them every bit of compelling information you can to help them see that your solution is perfect for their situation.

If your show and tell has more show than tell, you’ll earn more dough as well.